Useful resources – Infant feeding

Useful resources – Infant feeding


Don’t Google it!





Start your searches for infant feeding answers here. You will thank me.





Websites





All of the following websites have a wealth of information / blogs online.
Most of your questions will find answers here!

If I missed out your favorite, please add it in the comments 🙂





Breastfeeding.support





UK based IBCLC





Kelly Mom





America based IBCLC





Milk Meg





Australia based IBCLC





GP Infant Feeding Network





UK based GP’s !





La Leche Leauge





International breastfeeding Charity





Drugs in Breastmilk service (ABM)





General breastfeeding books
You’ve Got it in You: A Positive Guide to Breast Feeding – Emma Pickett





Breastfeeding and Medication – Wendy Jones
Why Mothers’ Medication Matters – Wendy Jones (shorter read)





The Positive Breastfeeding Book: Everything you need to feed your baby with confidence – Amy Brown 





Why Breastfeeding Matters – Charlotte Young 





Classic books
The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding – La Leche League International 





Adventures in Tandem Nursing: Breastfeeding During Pregnancy and Beyond – 





Hilary Flower





Breastfeeding supporters / specialists





The Breastfeeding Atlas – Barbara Wilson-Clay





Supporting Sucking Skills In Breastfeeding Infants – Catherine Watson Genna





Breastfeeding and Human Lactation, Enhanced Fifth Edition – Karen Wambach 





Milk Matters: Infant feeding & immune disorder – Maureen Minchin





Context, politics and more





The Politics of Breastfeeding: When Breasts are Bad for Business – Gabrielle Palmer
(short, hand size version)
Why the Politics of Breastfeeding Matter – Gabrielle Palmer 





Breastfeeding Uncovered: Who Really Decides How We Feed Our Babies? – Amy Brown 





The Big Letdown: How Medicine, Big Business, and Feminism Undermine Breastfeeding – Kimberly Seals Allers

With Black parents in mind





The Mocha Manual to a Fabulous Pregnancy – Kimberly Seals Allers





The Mocha Manual to Turning Your Passion into Profit: How to Find and Grow Your Side Hustle in Any Economy – Kimberly Seals Allers





The Mini Mocha Manual to a Fabulous Pregnancy: The Ultimate Pregnancy Guidebook for Black Women (The Mocha Manual 4)





– Kimberly Seals Allers





The Mocha Manual to Military Life: A Savvy Guide for Wives, Girlfriends, and Female Service Members – Kimberly Seals Allers





Free to Breastfeed: Voices of Black Mothers – Jeanine Valrie Logan 






Coming soon –
I am Not your Baby Mother  – Candice Brathwaite





With Islamic parents in mind





Breastfeeding in Ramadan: A Guide for Fasting Mothers – Latonia Anthony
Coming soon –
The Practical Guide to Breastfeeding in Islam – Latonia Anthony









Adoption, relataction 





Breastfeeding Without Birthing: A Breastfeeding Guide for Mothers through Adoption, Surrogacy, and Other Special Circumstances – Alyssa Schnell
Where’s the Mother? Stories from a Transgender Dad – Trevor MacDonald





Sleep 





Holistic Sleep Coaching: Gentle Alternatives to Sleep Training for Health and Childcare Professionals – Lyndsey Hookway





Why Your Baby’s Sleep Matters – Sarah Ockwell-Smith





Sweet Sleep: Nighttime and Naptime Strategies for the Breastfeeding Family – La Leche League International
Boobin’ All Day Boobin’ All Night: A Gentle Approach to Sleep For Breastfeeding Families – Meg Nagle IBCLC





Birth & body autonomy





The Positive Birth Book: A New Approach to Pregnancy, Birth and the Early Weeks –  Milli Hill





The Microbiome Effect: How Your Baby’s Birth Influences Their Future Health – Alex Wakeford





Period Power – Maisie Hill 





The Breast Book: A puberty guide with a difference – it’s the when, why and how of breasts – Emma Pickett 









Food Allergies
Crying Babies and Food: In the early years – Maureen Minchin





Infant Formula and Modern Epidemics: The milk hypothesis – Maureen Minchin
The Busy Parent’s Guide To Food Allergies: Everything you need to know about cow’s milk allergy and other childhood food allergies – Mrs Zoe T Williams





ALL of the Why it matters books!) 





Parenting
Why Babywearing Matters – Rosie Knowles 





How To Talk So Little Kids Will Listen: A Survival Guide to Life with Children Ages 2-7 – Joanna Faber





No Bad Kids: Toddler Discipline Without Shame – Janet Lansbury






Big Latch On & Workshops


They came, they latched on, & they went home with a spring in their step.





Here’s what happened when the Big Latch on and workshops came to High Wycombe in August 2019.









Every year, all around the world, from 1 to 7 August is World Breastfeeding Week. Individuals and organisations alike, are encouraged celebrate, collaborate and empower parents to breastfeed.

This year, I was able to bring something new to my local town and community. We met at the local Library for a 2 hour session with workshops from myself, a local independent Midwife and a Doula. For good measure, we added in a Big Latch On and the result was a whole lot of love and fun.





Achivements





Across the world, the BIG LATCH ON 2019 organizers counted.





  • 17,846 children breastfeeding during the one minute count.
  • 18,694 breastfeeding people attended.
  • 56,442 people attended registered Global Big Latch On locations to support breastfeeding.




We raised £36 to split between our local branches of La Leche League & Womens Aid – thank you again to all the local businesses that donated a prizes.









Breastfeeding Myths & Questions






My session, as it turns out, was far bigger than the 20 minute slot I allocated myself to answer the breastfeeding myths and questions from the people in the room. We got through a few but honestly, we could have talked about most of them for 20 mins and some, many hours!

So for those of you who where in the room and did not get your card addressed, Breastfeeding Myths & Questions (Part 1) is up now. I hope it gets you started on your own journey of self empowerment (this years #worldbreastfeedingweek theme).

Lastly, if you are sad you missed out on all the fun, and don’t want to wait until next year, maybe #SundaySessions will be your thing.
Get in touch to find out more









#worldbreastfeedingweek2019
#empower #support #wefeedtoo #diversityininfantfeeding #latchon #brestfeedingspecalist #breastfeeding #mum #dad #parent #baby #toddler #pregnant #midwife #doula #raffle #localbusiness #shoplocal #eatlocal #canva #library #communityevent






10 things about the Who Code (infant milks)


The WHO code & your business.





So you run a baby business and some has mentioned the WHO code on marketing baby milk. They might have suggested that you are unintentionally violating it.

You are confused right? You are passionate about breastfeeding, how could you be doing something unhelpful?





Here’s what you need to know. This is COMPLEX issue. This is brief .





Thing 1 This is not just about hippies boycotting Nestle





Formula companies care about profit first. They do not care about families like we do.
If you are not convinced, try the Channel 4 Dispatches documentary or the film Tigers about Nestle.





Thing 2 Protects all, not just breastfeeding families





Parents need impartial information about feeding their babies, free from misleading or idealised marketing. It is available here via First Steps Nutrition





Thing 3 Advertising influences our behaviours





In the new age of sponsorship and social media, companies are finding even more inventive ways to reach parents. If you are paid by a code violating company to advertise their product, you are complicit in their sneaky ways. Do you mean to be?





Thing 4 When you know better, you can do better.





What you say and do online will reach many people. Make sure the partnerships and giveaways you do, are inline with your personal values.





The British Medical Journal just ended their advertising agreements with baby milk companies , its an interesting read.





Thing 5 There are good companies out there!





The Global Big Latch on have a fab recent blog with examples,





Think of a big brand in the baby world, there is a large chance they are





Known violators, Medela, Lansinoh, Mothercare.





Thing 6 Parents are being misled





All Party Parliamentary Group on Infant Feeding and Inequalities (APPGIFI) was formed to address these issues. You can invite your local MP to attend.





Thing 7 The ripples spread





The lure of a network of breastfeeding events with freebies is a sneaky way of increasing brand loyalty. You have a platform, why not use it to explain why you will *not participate in, or partner with events & companies who undermine breastfeeding?





Thing 8 Ethical sources of funding matter





There are many sources of funding for small businesses, other than the comity coin types. Usually, getting in contact with your local council will have resources. There is national lottery funding and many more. Yes this will take more effort, but it is honestly the right thing to do.





Thing 9 Supermarket community schemes





The WHO code and UK LAW prohibit a number of commonly ignored practices around sales of baby milk & food. For this reason, many organizations prohibit the use of their schemes. If you use one, you may find yourself being turned away from events who need to be WHO code compliant.





Thing 10 Closing off collatorations





Be mindful of your partnerships when you are seeking collaborative projects with other organisations. You may find, that Baby friendly healthcare teams refuse to work with you if you are unaware of the WHO code. An International Board certified Lactation Consultant would not be able to work with any known code violators or with someone who is in breach of their code of ethics. (Conflict of interests)





An International Board certified Lactation Consultant would not be able to work with any known code violators or with someone who is in breach of their code of ethics. (Conflict of interests)





More Information





Baby Milk Action (UK), Baby Feeding Law Group, The International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN0 for reports and monitoring





First Steps Nutrition Impartial information on baby milk & food <5 years





Unicef Baby Friendly Health care teams





The original WHO code


Is that even a real thing?


We are standing in our uniforms and she interrupts my conversation to ask, “Is that even a real thing? This lactation thingy? “





There is no attempt to hide the contempt in her voice, neither the less, I reply with confidence.





Yes! My full title will be an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) when I pass the exam in October. “





I puff with pride with anticipation of my impending status.





A medical consultant in the room, back turned to me, shares a joke at my expense with the questioning lady. They both laugh and I falter.









Study





I have been carting my 1000+ word textbook around with me for over a year now, fitting study into every available moment of downtime.





Once a shiny new, this expensive textbook now sports pages that are scared with notes and the spine that held it together, gave out a while ago.





Standing in a room of moking health professionals, I feel like the glue holding us both together evaporated in an instant.





Not uncommon





This is not an uncommon experience I am told as in the UK, IBCLC’s are not a recognised professional group. A lactation consultant is not a protected term either. Yet all around the world, it is the premier, gold standard in lacation education & support.





Through their training, an IBCLC has the skills to support every parent, from the normal course of breastfeeding to helping a family navigate the complexities of lactation during cancer treatment. You will find them working as Midwives, leading Infant feeding teams within NHS trusts, and running drop in clinics within the community.





Some IBCLC’s work even harder, to enter the field as a non health care professional investing even more time and money that their health care counter parts. It is a much needed profession, with much research backing up their value.





I have been on the journey here since the first mother-baby duo I supported on a maternity ward as a college student. Since then, I have spent 1000’s of hours (paid and voluntary) & thousands of pounds working towards this goal.





Parents want to breastfeed





Here in the UK, 80% of mothers start breastfeeding, but by 6 months 1% remains breastfeeding. That’s a sharp drop off and its not down to just one thing.





Since starting this job, I have heard all the staff feeding journeys and in their vulnerable moments even seen their tears. Very few met their breastfeeding goals and even though it’s not in my job description as a Paediatric nurse to listen, it’s in my nature as a Breastfeeding Counsellor, so listen I do.





So I hear the grief behind the words, I see how it translates into resentment and undermining of other professionals & parents alike. This is not sustainable.





It’s time for change









I remember a conversation with one member of staff, who was so angry about the levels of training of health professionals helping her family. She was enraged the IBCLC they had eventually seen, said they did not fail, it was the system that failed them.





I shared with her the amount of training on breastfeeding in the various health care professionals education and we both agreed, parents & health care workers desedrve better.





There is no one easy way to change the systemic bias above but what if we rethink our approach?





What if our next efforts to normative breastfeeding start with the next generation in schools. The Association of Breastfeeding Mothers has released free lesson plans for teachers & I love this idea.





Reading through some of the exercises though, I realised that some of the content would be news to people I work within hospitals.





But if generations of children know the basics of breastfeeding, the ones who enter healthcare will already be better breastfeeding advocates without any change in training. It might just work.





Maybe..





Either way, the next time someone asks me,





“Is that even a real thing? This lactation thingy? “





I shall reply;





“Why yes it is, and the fact you asked illustrates perfectly why.”





Then again, maybe not 😉










Tessa Clark BSc, RNc





Balances being a Paediatric nurse, Breastfeeding counselor (private and voluntary) & IBCLC exam candidate Oct 2019 with motherhood.


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