Last & Next (Nov & Dec)

Last & Next (Nov & Dec)










Resting and recuperating after the intensity of October + IBCLC exam study.





Focus – Behind the scenes, building business













Often a busy time, without the added tasks of child rearing. Evening and weekend appointments available.






Focus – Gifting confidence. 










Breastfeeding support should free






Is it really free? Should it be?





It’s a common idea, anything that is essential in life, would be available free if it was needed.





Is there a need?





As a breastfeeding supporter, I see this applied to my specialism constantly. The need does not seem to be there with the uk having one of the lowest breastfeeding rates in the world. But when 74% of parents initiate breastfeeding in the UK, you have to wonder, what got in their way of reaching their feeding goals?





We need to change the conversation around breastfeeding; it is time to stop laying the blame for the UK’s low breastfeeding rates in the laps of individual women and instead acknowledge that this is a public health imperative for which government, policy makers, communities and families all share responsibility.

Unicef – a call to action




Decent from within





It’s not just the general public who are opposed to the idea of parents paying for support in anyway.





It is not uncommon to see a seasoned health professional speaking against other professionals, being vehemently opposed to a private IBCLC charging parents for support.

Yet when you look at the pre registration training of health care professionals in the UK, an IBCLC is the ONLY one to have the full set of desirable topics in their training in this report.

This is where I feel all opponents are all missing the point and hurting truly innovative & caring souls.





Free at the point of care





In this western, modern world, the only truly free things, are given by loved ones. There rest of the things that seem free, have a price, even if you don’t notice you are paying it.





This what has come of the dream of the NHS 70 years ago, many services are, are the point a person access it, free.

But that is not the full picture. How is it funded? By the Government you think, yes and where do they get the money? From Tax payers. Not free then.





And how about the staff delivering the support? They are paid to be there, by whome? We follow the money back to the tax payer.





Do it yourself





We are used to idea of DIY, a video on how to do anything online and try to fix it your self tasks. Sometimes they go well and at best the efforts are a waste of time and money but at worst, goals are not met and people get hurt.

When we have a problem with our plumbing, or our car, we are all quite comfortable handing money over to a specialist who can help, as we readily recognize their skill, that we do not share.

So why is breastfeeding support any different?

If you are thinking now about the people who cannot afford it, the inequities in health care and the undeserved communities, I hear you. This is a problem for us ALL and not solved by lambasting a private specialist alone.

I have yet to meet one who has turned their back on a family in need when they cannot afford their service. I know first hand, the amount of free support, or effort to refer on breastfeeding supporters take.

Many of the supporters I know are innovating, educating and leading change. Do you want to work against these people? or with them





Funding





So maybe a way forward, is to group together, campaign for more funding and then share it.

Parents get the free support they deserve, and breastfeeding specialists get the salary and recognition they deserve.









Further Reading





Break down of home visit costs
What is an IBCLC
Hospital Infant Feeding Network
WBTi – UK report Card


Useful resources – Infant feeding


Don’t Google it!





Start your searches for infant feeding answers here. You will thank me.





Websites





All of the following websites have a wealth of information / blogs online.
Most of your questions will find answers here!

If I missed out your favorite, please add it in the comments 🙂





Breastfeeding.support





UK based IBCLC





Kelly Mom





America based IBCLC





Milk Meg





Australia based IBCLC





GP Infant Feeding Network





UK based GP’s !





La Leche Leauge





International breastfeeding Charity





Drugs in Breastmilk service (ABM)





General breastfeeding books
You’ve Got it in You: A Positive Guide to Breast Feeding – Emma Pickett





Breastfeeding and Medication – Wendy Jones
Why Mothers’ Medication Matters – Wendy Jones (shorter read)





The Positive Breastfeeding Book: Everything you need to feed your baby with confidence – Amy Brown 





Why Breastfeeding Matters – Charlotte Young 





Classic books
The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding – La Leche League International 





Adventures in Tandem Nursing: Breastfeeding During Pregnancy and Beyond – 





Hilary Flower





Breastfeeding supporters / specialists





The Breastfeeding Atlas – Barbara Wilson-Clay





Supporting Sucking Skills In Breastfeeding Infants – Catherine Watson Genna





Breastfeeding and Human Lactation, Enhanced Fifth Edition – Karen Wambach 





Milk Matters: Infant feeding & immune disorder – Maureen Minchin





Context, politics and more





The Politics of Breastfeeding: When Breasts are Bad for Business – Gabrielle Palmer
(short, hand size version)
Why the Politics of Breastfeeding Matter – Gabrielle Palmer 





Breastfeeding Uncovered: Who Really Decides How We Feed Our Babies? – Amy Brown 





The Big Letdown: How Medicine, Big Business, and Feminism Undermine Breastfeeding – Kimberly Seals Allers

With Black parents in mind





The Mocha Manual to a Fabulous Pregnancy – Kimberly Seals Allers





The Mocha Manual to Turning Your Passion into Profit: How to Find and Grow Your Side Hustle in Any Economy – Kimberly Seals Allers





The Mini Mocha Manual to a Fabulous Pregnancy: The Ultimate Pregnancy Guidebook for Black Women (The Mocha Manual 4)





– Kimberly Seals Allers





The Mocha Manual to Military Life: A Savvy Guide for Wives, Girlfriends, and Female Service Members – Kimberly Seals Allers





Free to Breastfeed: Voices of Black Mothers – Jeanine Valrie Logan 






Coming soon –
I am Not your Baby Mother  – Candice Brathwaite





With Islamic parents in mind





Breastfeeding in Ramadan: A Guide for Fasting Mothers – Latonia Anthony
Coming soon –
The Practical Guide to Breastfeeding in Islam – Latonia Anthony









Adoption, relataction 





Breastfeeding Without Birthing: A Breastfeeding Guide for Mothers through Adoption, Surrogacy, and Other Special Circumstances – Alyssa Schnell
Where’s the Mother? Stories from a Transgender Dad – Trevor MacDonald





Sleep 





Holistic Sleep Coaching: Gentle Alternatives to Sleep Training for Health and Childcare Professionals – Lyndsey Hookway





Why Your Baby’s Sleep Matters – Sarah Ockwell-Smith





Sweet Sleep: Nighttime and Naptime Strategies for the Breastfeeding Family – La Leche League International
Boobin’ All Day Boobin’ All Night: A Gentle Approach to Sleep For Breastfeeding Families – Meg Nagle IBCLC





Birth & body autonomy





The Positive Birth Book: A New Approach to Pregnancy, Birth and the Early Weeks –  Milli Hill





The Microbiome Effect: How Your Baby’s Birth Influences Their Future Health – Alex Wakeford





Period Power – Maisie Hill 





The Breast Book: A puberty guide with a difference – it’s the when, why and how of breasts – Emma Pickett 









Food Allergies
Crying Babies and Food: In the early years – Maureen Minchin





Infant Formula and Modern Epidemics: The milk hypothesis – Maureen Minchin
The Busy Parent’s Guide To Food Allergies: Everything you need to know about cow’s milk allergy and other childhood food allergies – Mrs Zoe T Williams





ALL of the Why it matters books!) 





Parenting
Why Babywearing Matters – Rosie Knowles 





How To Talk So Little Kids Will Listen: A Survival Guide to Life with Children Ages 2-7 – Joanna Faber





No Bad Kids: Toddler Discipline Without Shame – Janet Lansbury






Breastfeeding (hunger) cues

#1 thing parents of many babies misunderstand (inc some health professionals).


😭crying😭 is the last hunger cue, and consistently missing it can affect your milk supply.


If you wait for crying or consistently settle a baby in a way other than breastfeeding them (dummies, rocking, slings), the supply and demand system gets disrupted.


Less milk removed = signals to make less milk = problems!


It’s not uncommon to meet mothers with plugged ducts, mastitis who have fallen into this trap.


You can’t over feed breastfed babies!


If you are avoiding feeds due to cracked, sore nipples, it’s time for face to face skilled help. Most problems can be helped if not fixed with attention to positioning and attachment alone.


Or feeling touched out? Find someone to talk to, there is always a new #breastfeedingsolotion to try out 🙂


#beyondbabyhood The hunger cues get a bit more obvious, with tapping breasts, all the way to shouting ‘BOOBIES’ in the supermarket.


How does your little (or not so little) one tell you that they are ready for milk? I’d love to know 🙂


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