There isn’t that much to know – is there?

There isn’t that much to know – is there?


5th ed Wombach & Riordan




Except, about breastfeeding and human lactation, there really really is.





When I am seen carrying around my text books, whilst I study for the IBCLC certification exam, and I am asked all the time why there is so much to know about breastfeeding.





You just pop your baby on and hay presto right?





Not quite, and when the collective wisdom does not include breastfeeding, parents, (including me), have to seek those who do know.





The other day, I poped on an old music album I loved as a young person and I was singing away with the exact lyrics some 15 years later without missing a beat.





It’s normalized





In places where breastfeeding is 100% normalised, this is how it is for the breastfeeding dyad. There is no need to read, consult and be confused about the ins and outs of there normal course of breastfeeding because it is lived, seen and known in all corners of life. The questions don’t even form, its just normal.





New baby feeds for hours in an evening? Normal.





Baby feeding little and often in a heatwave? Normal.





Breastfeeding in public? Normal.





So then, much like my intermediate knowledge of Steps songs, the breastfeeding wisdom is there, ready to be applied quietly in your mind and that worried phone call to a helpline never even occurs.
Your post person, as much as your aunt is able to speak from experience and offer helpful suggestions.





This is not how it is for many parents in the UK.





We have lost this wisdom and breastfeeding is a forgin thing to many people.
It means pareents are scared to meet their babies needs, children are growing up unsure how babies are fed and all the while pregnant familes are cramming all they can into their lives before the baby comes.





In a perfect world, we’d all know about the basics of breastfeeding long before pregnancy.. but we don’t so until then we need parents supporting parents, skilled breastfeeding supporters and breastfeeding specialists.





Antenatal learning





And if you want to do thing about this gap in your own experiences, why not see if there is an antenatal breastfeeding workshop like mine, near you?





Pregnant parents can come to my Antenatal breastfeeding workshops booking now for Oct – Feb, read what other parents loved about them here





And if you are in High Wycombe and want a friendly face to answer your breastfeeding questions, PM me to find out how to work 1:1 with me.


Breastfeeding support should free






Is it really free? Should it be?





It’s a common idea, anything that is essential in life, would be available free if it was needed.





Is there a need?





As a breastfeeding supporter, I see this applied to my specialism constantly. The need does not seem to be there with the uk having one of the lowest breastfeeding rates in the world. But when 74% of parents initiate breastfeeding in the UK, you have to wonder, what got in their way of reaching their feeding goals?





We need to change the conversation around breastfeeding; it is time to stop laying the blame for the UK’s low breastfeeding rates in the laps of individual women and instead acknowledge that this is a public health imperative for which government, policy makers, communities and families all share responsibility.

Unicef – a call to action




Decent from within





It’s not just the general public who are opposed to the idea of parents paying for support in anyway.





It is not uncommon to see a seasoned health professional speaking against other professionals, being vehemently opposed to a private IBCLC charging parents for support.

Yet when you look at the pre registration training of health care professionals in the UK, an IBCLC is the ONLY one to have the full set of desirable topics in their training in this report.

This is where I feel all opponents are all missing the point and hurting truly innovative & caring souls.





Free at the point of care





In this western, modern world, the only truly free things, are given by loved ones. There rest of the things that seem free, have a price, even if you don’t notice you are paying it.





This what has come of the dream of the NHS 70 years ago, many services are, are the point a person access it, free.

But that is not the full picture. How is it funded? By the Government you think, yes and where do they get the money? From Tax payers. Not free then.





And how about the staff delivering the support? They are paid to be there, by whome? We follow the money back to the tax payer.





Do it yourself





We are used to idea of DIY, a video on how to do anything online and try to fix it your self tasks. Sometimes they go well and at best the efforts are a waste of time and money but at worst, goals are not met and people get hurt.

When we have a problem with our plumbing, or our car, we are all quite comfortable handing money over to a specialist who can help, as we readily recognize their skill, that we do not share.

So why is breastfeeding support any different?

If you are thinking now about the people who cannot afford it, the inequities in health care and the undeserved communities, I hear you. This is a problem for us ALL and not solved by lambasting a private specialist alone.

I have yet to meet one who has turned their back on a family in need when they cannot afford their service. I know first hand, the amount of free support, or effort to refer on breastfeeding supporters take.

Many of the supporters I know are innovating, educating and leading change. Do you want to work against these people? or with them





Funding





So maybe a way forward, is to group together, campaign for more funding and then share it.

Parents get the free support they deserve, and breastfeeding specialists get the salary and recognition they deserve.









Further Reading





Break down of home visit costs
What is an IBCLC
Hospital Infant Feeding Network
WBTi – UK report Card


Breastfeeding Myths & Questions (part 1)



Every year, all around the world, from 1 to 7 August is World Breastfeeding Week. Individuals and organisations alike, are encouraged celebrate, collaborate and empower parents to get more families breastfeeding and for longer.





This year, I was able to bring something new to my local town and community.

For The Big Latch on & Workshops, we met at the local Library for a 2 hour session with workshops from myself, a local independent Midwife, a Doula and an early year educator to help with the children.

For good measure, we added in a Big Latch On and the result was a whole lot of love and fun. See photos and read more about it here.





Breastfeeding Myths and Questions





All of the parents in attendance where given an index card and asked to write either a myth about breastfeeding that they have heard, or a question they had and give them back to me. We then discussed the answers as a room, with input and ideas from other supporters in the room too.









It turns out, the 20 mins I allocated myself to answer the questions was woefully short. We got through a few but honestly, we could have talked about most of them for 20 mins alone. and some, many hours!





So my promise to those in the room, was that I would blog the answers to their questions (see images bellow) and share. It also turns out, that I don’t know how to do a quick answer 😉 so here is part one with more to follow soon… ish.









Part 1 questions





  • Can I drink wine when feeding?
  • How do I know if I have mastitis if I don’t have pink nipples of white breasts? ( I can’t see a red mark on dark skin)
  • Can you REALLY make breast milk if you are adopting a newborn and haven’t had kid previously? How does it work?
  • What to do when baby has tongue tie? What else about the physiology of a babies mouth can hinder breastfeeding / other issues?












Your Questions





I could write a separate blog on each of these questions as there is so much to say on them all. Your interests might not run so deep so I have tried to keep to the main points for each but if you want to know more, or have information/experience to share, please do get in touch! 




Can I drink wine when feeding?





The guidelines on drinking alcohol in pregnancy has swung backwards and forwards over the course of the past years so I wouldn’t blame you if you where confused about if it is safe to drink Alcohol whilst breastfeeding.

The short answer is yes, you can. A glass of wine, with your family as you eat your meal is A OK. However, if you feel to drunk to parent, you are probably also too drunk to breastfeed.

Whilst not feeding, you might need to express to relive engorgement during, but you need only wait until you feel sober again to breastfeed as your blood and milk have the same levels of Alcohol in them.

Knowing this Pumping and dumping for one drink is over the top but do not just take my word for it, see bellow for the science.





Read more?
Dr Jack Newman, rewound IBCLC, explores the science and he reckons the perceived rules around drinking alcohol act as a barrier to longer breastfeeding and better all round health for everyone (due to lower disease rates, not more alcohol ;)).

This Blog by UK IBCLC  Philippa Pearson-Glaze  is also very comprehensive.













How do I know if I have mastitis if I don’t have pink nipples of white breasts?
( I can’t see a red mark on dark skin)





This is a fabulous question and related to many questions being asked since the 2018 MBRACE report starkly pointed out the difference in perinatal mortality rates in the UK for black and brown parents. ( see link for more information).

When asked, most health care professionals and supporters will tell you the common text book answer and then look puzzled when I point out theirs and the books assumption that the lactating person is white.





The lady who wrote this question told us her story of mastitis and miss diagnosis, another mother in the room told a similar which had a hospital admission for sepsis. Everyone was shocked by the experiences they had, a few of us though, where not so surprised. That could be a whole other blog post so back to what to look for when your skin comes in a different colour that the text book, when you suspect mastitis.





You might see..





  • Swollen breast due to poor/non existent drainage.
  • You might notice a painful, hotter area on your breast
  • You might feel a harder area, a lump but this is not always present.
  • Some parents report feeling like being hit with the flu all of a sudden, others others mention vertigo and feeling dizzy.




If a milk duct is blocked, unless there is milk at the tip of the nipple, this will be only a subtle, if at all visible difference. There is often nipple pain when you press where the suspected blockage is, and a small swelling might be visible after a feed/pumping session.





Read more? Plugged Ducts and Mastitis – Kelly Mom (US IBCLC)

A book worth waiting for (2020)- I am Not your Baby Mother by Candice Brathwaite

Black Breastfeeding Week Celebration – Breaking Barriers & Uplifting Education – 1-2-1 Doula

Why are black mothers at more risk of dying? – BBC News 2019









Can you REALLY make breast milk if you are adopting a newborn and haven’t had kid previously? How does it work?





The short answer is, yes you can! Many of these parents are experts at defining their own success with a range of options and a range of amounts of milk supply reached.





As we know even a few drops, at any stage of lactation will contain thousands of immune factors. It literally is liquid gold!





Some parents will choose to offer comfort at their breast/chest and not try to induce a supply specifically, where as others will embark upon a regime of simulation and sometimes hormones before the baby is due. Just with anything in life, parents do what works for them and their family.





Read more?





Sweat Pea Breastfeeding support is run by a US IBCLC, she also co-hosts a fab podcast, Breastfeeding outside the box

Breastfeeding Without Birthing: A Breastfeeding Guide for Mothers through Adoption, Surrogacy, and Other Special Circumstances  – Alyssa Schnell

Where’s the Mother?: Stories from a Transgender Dad – Trevor MacDonald . A compelling read.









What to do when baby has tongue tie?
What else about the physiology of a babies mouth can hinder breastfeeding / other issues?





Breastfeeding with a Tongue Tie, is a complex subject and one that often requires specially trained individuals to diagnose and ideally ongoing skilled help to help you both re learn how to latch and attach more effectively. 

All of this is best done 1:1, with a skilled helper and this is also where other physical issues (differential diagnosis) can be explored. You can read more general information in the links bellow.

Some general tips
Research and talk to other parents who have been affected too.

Many parents find the flipple or exaggerated latch helpful

Ask for help when you need it.

Read more
Tongue-tie in Babies: A Guide for Parents - Sarah Okley (IBCLC) a direct pdf download.

Tongue Tie - La Leche Leauge

Association of Tongue-tie Practitioners to find trained individuals (Link ATP)

Supporting Sucking Skills - For supporters and medically minded parents.

Flipple - Milk Meg (IBCLC)




Get in touch to find out more






What actually happens in a 1:1 session?


(Blurr to protect confidentiality)




Once we’ve agreed upon a date and time, I’ll send you a previsit questionnaire. This makes sure I know a bit about you before I come also helps us both plan what we are going to cover.





We start in your home, where you are comfortable and sessions last between 1-2 hours.





I’ll bring my bags with resources and slings with me and we’ll use which ever one’s seem to fit your situation.





Often support people are around too, to share in learning and support you.





But what do you actually DO?





Are you are wondering what just can you cover in a session with me?





What am are you going to get from it?





How is it really different to what is available for free locally?









Listening





No, you are not failing at this. Yes it is this hard and yes it will get easier (eventually).

Every family I help, get’s to tell their story. The highs, the lows and somehow the deepest darkest fears about parenting always make their way to the surface. This is a result of my honed listening skills and experience and training. Many of us rarely experience the true gift of being listened too, with out judgement or suggestion. Often, parents I work with discover the answers they need, where already inside of them!

The complex mix of hormones during the first months of parenthood, literally compel you to seek support and find the answers to your problems but many of us do not find the skilled support they need and its not uncommon to feel confused and conflicted by all the conflicting information presented to us by loved ones and professionals.





Love





You might be feeling lost, overwhelmed or struggling to cope with the intensity of your baby/child’s needs. What ever their age, what ever led you to me, I shall meet you with love and work with you to honor your unique situation.





Shared Learning





You might feel like no one has ever experienced your problems, or can understand the complexity of your scenario. It’s quite normal to feel this way and I would say that it is unlikely that there aren’t familiar themes within them that I have come across before.
I will say that every family I work with do teach me something new, sometimes this might be reaching medical conditions but often it related to the wonder of the human spirit and the resilience of families.
I am not an expert in anything, not even myself! But I am a specialist, I have read many books, studied for many hours so that you do not have too. I can give you a short cut to the answers you seek, and suggest ideas you might not have come across before.





Sometimes I might need to seek further answers from others, this is the wonder of being a chatty person with a huge network of other breastfeeding supporters to ask. Either way, you will never hear me say, I don’t know, I give up. If you chose to work with me, I will help you find the answers you seek, beyond babyhood.





Beyond Babyhood





Many parents feel a bit abandoned after the intense monitoring and supervision during their entry to parenthood. Breastfeeding support services are often targeted at newborns and it can leave you a bit lost.
I remember the loss of intense support so hard, especially when I felt most in need. So my services are different. Not only can I help you with problems you are experiencing now, we can stay in touch for as long as you need too, beyond babyhood.
If you sign up for one of the packages, you can join a clients only Whatsap group and The Quintessential package has monthly video meetings and you can keep on accessing skilled support alongside other parents who share a similar determination as you.





See also Babywearing Consultation





Common Topics





Here are some of the things we can cover during a session, with many able to be done online too. Book a Warm Welcome call to find out more and plan your sessions.









Antenatal breastfeeding preparation
Stretchy Wrap with newborns
Newborn breastfeeding support
Complex breastfeeding challenges

Introduction to slings
Troubleshooting your own slings
Starting solids
Biting

Refusal to breastfeed
Return to work
Tandem nursing
Night weaning

Toddlers and food
Night time parenting
Nursing manners
Ending breastfeeding

Woven wrap skills
Back Carrying
Preparing for Adoption
Debriefing breastfeeding experiences





and much more


Why attend a breastfeeding event?

Did you notice the online chatter recently, about breastfeeding weeks and celebrations?


If this is your first year as a breastfeeding parent, you might wonder what they are all about and why someone might go to an event about it.


Breastfeeding used to be the unquestioned norm of feeding and raising babies but a few generations ago things started to shift.


Why do they exist


This shift (& many other factors) has left parents today without the rich, knowledgeable support networks of the past.


This means not only is their neighbor ill equipped to normalize night time wakefulness, but also your health care professionals are less well informed. Pair this with less funding for services means, there is not enough skilled support available at the time when parents need it most.



And so, less parents are able to reach their breastfeeding goals and they carry those feelings around forever. These weeks are for you too as many of us long to hear parents say, I wanted to breastfeed, & I did!


World Breastfeeding Week


is celebrated around the world in the first week of August every year, since 1992 when a landmark world wide collaboration began to protect and promote breastfeeding.


Another very important week, is Black Breastfeeding Week, do check that out too 🙂


So where do I come in to this?


Last year I hosted the Big Latch on, another global initiative designed to unite breastfeeding patents and supporters within local communities world wide.


It was a low key but well attended event where we met in the Rye park and all latched our breastfeeding kids on at the designated time.


The weather was glorious and parents enjoyed chatting with one another but I knew we could do more this year!



So this year I am celebrating World Breastfeeding Week by hosting a local Global Big Latch On but adding in workshops aimed at empowering local parents.


I teamed up with The Village Midwife and Helen – Born Smiling for something even more super!


What do parents get?


Aside from meeting other local patents, breastfeeding together in public and eating cake you mean?


Realizing you are not alone


Our workshops aim to normalize birth, breastfeeding and the transition into parenthood. They can be so many feelings, so much conflicting information and it can be hard to know where to turn.


Meeting skilled supporters


So meeting local, skilled supporters in one place is very handy! You can bet we know most of the other people in area too and would be happy to signpost you on 🙂


Meet other breastfeeding families


Many parents also feel quite isolated if they do move beyond their breastfeeding goals as only 1% are still breastfeeding for around 6 months, with even less than 0.5% breastfeeding after 1 year.


Be empowered to meet your goals


So finding other breastfeeding parents can be hard beyond babyhood, but as you might have guessed, I know a fair few 😉


Win a raffle prize


Local business women have donated vouches for their birth and baby related businesses, from baby yoga, to a postnatal support course. A full list is coming soon, but you gotta be in it to win it!



Book me in!


So if you are local to High Wycombe or are willing to travel, (we have a train station) Book here for Big Latch on & Workshops .


Find out about events near you for World Breastfeeding Week .


Find out about the Big Latch On, and find an event near you.


How did I get here?


Tessa Clark
📷 by Elle Narbrook




I trained  for four years, in busy London Childrens hospitals as Paediatric nurse, qualifying in 2011.
After becoming a mother, I discovered a new thirst for knowledge in supporting mothers with carrying and feeding. 





So in 2016 I started a sling library in High Wycombe, undertook peer support training with the School of Babywearing. At the same time, I also began training to be a breastfeeding counselor (BFc) with a national breastfeeding organisation.






“I wanted to become the supporter I needed”






I became a carrying (babywearing consultant) in 2016 with Slingababy, whilst also completing my breastfeeding counselor training (Bfc). I was BUSY!  





Running two very busy voluntary groups, working part time AND being a mum, was too much for me and my family, so I handed over the sling library to its current custodian & it is still thriving.






I have spent years and a fair amount of money volunteering, and now it is time to offer my skills to you all, so I can save you some time and hard work.  





In 2018, after a few years nurturing my growing family and supporting mothers in the voluntary sector as a BFc, I made the commitment to undertake a year long breastfeeding specialist course (self funded!), with the aim of becoming an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant.





I sat the exam in Oct 2019 & the results are due end of Dec 2019..





Update..





I passed 😀 This wont be news to you if are reading this after 2020. I am excited to see what this new chapter will bring to my life.





 





These days..





I am supporting parents in their homes, and online with feeding and carrying.





I am teaching introduction to slings workshops with in The Village Midwives Postnatal course.





I am still also…





I am working one day a week in hospital as a Paediatric nurse. 





I am podcasting about feeding at carrying. 





as of 2020 I will be winding down my face to face breastfeeding counseling role.





Want to work with me?





If you feel I am a good fit to support you, I look forward to hearing from you soon 🙂 














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